Strange Remains

Forensic anthropology and bioarchaeology news and blogs; about the curious things that happen to human remains, the strange ways they are found, and the even the weird ways they are used in art.
www.strangeremains.com

Bones of Iron Age Warriors in Danish Bog Were Mutilated

Merovingian necropolis reveals 300 graves

Burial practices

The graves were found at a variety of depths with some up to 1.50 m deep. Each burial contained the deceased once contained within a wooden coffin, now completely rotted away.

An examination of the contents of these burials allowed them to be split into three main groups or periods of inhumation

  • Graves with artefacts and ornaments dating to 5th century AD.
  • Fewer grave goods are in evidence after 5th century AD as the population has become Christian.
  • 7th century AD burials are characterised with individuals wearing simple or highly decorated belt buckles of bronze or iron.

In one of the earlier graves, archaeologists have unearthed the skeleton of an adult man with a particularly rich assemblage of twenty grave goods consisting of ceramics, glassware, a bronze basin, tin plate, even a wooden bucket with bronze strapping, a decorated Frankish axe, spear, dagger in his belt and silver coin deposited on the mouth. This man went well dressed into the afterlife, as he was even wearing a pair of shoes.

Read more at Past Horizons

Lead in teeth can tell a body’s tale

Your teeth can tell stories about you, and not just that you always forget to floss.         

A study led by University of Florida geology researcher George D. Kamenov showed that trace amounts of lead in modern and historical human teeth can give clues about where they came from. The paper will be published in the August issue of Science of The Total Environment.

The discovery could help police solve cold cases, Kamenov said. For instance, if an unidentified decomposed body is found, testing the lead in the teeth could immediately help focus the investigation on a certain geographic area. That way, law enforcement can avoid wasting resources checking for missing persons in the wrong places.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2014-07-teeth-body-tale.html#jCp

This Octopus Is the Most Dedicated Mother Known in the Animal Kingdom

Vintage photo of the mummies of Capuchin Catacombs in Palermo ca. 1870.

Vintage photo of the mummies of Capuchin Catacombs in Palermo ca. 1870.

(Source: ebay.com)

Youngest victims of MH17 the hardest to identify: Relatives asked for finger paintings and bottles

2,000 year old burials discovered in South Kazakhstan

2,000 year old burials discovered in South Kazakhstan

Kazakhstani archaeologists have discovered artefacts of historical significance during excavation of the ancient settlement of Kultobe in South Kazakhstan, tengrinews.kz reports.

The three mounds in Ordabasy district in South Kazakhstan Oblast contained remains of 12 people, including that of a child. They were all buried at different times.

The scientists believe they belong to the mysterious and poorly studied state of Kang-kü or Kangju. The state existed from the 2nd century BC until the 4th century AD and was a nomadic federation of unknown ethnic and linguistic origin. They were one of the greatest powers on the territory of Central Asia for about two centuries and even the Chinese had to reckon with this power in the West. Still, little is known about Kangju.

Read more at the Archaeology News Network
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X-ray of a ballet dancer’s feet 
The ankle joint connects the lower leg to the foot and, in dance, allows for pointing the toe (plantar flexion) and flexing the foot during plié (dorsiflexion). The ankle also allows for inversion and eversion, producing turn-in and turn-out, respectively. The 26 bones in the foot work in concert with ligamentous support and muscular force to create three separate arches, critical for shock absorption during jumps. Structurally, the ideal foot for ballet is considered to be a flexible “square foot”, which has equal-length first and second toes.Read more: http://bit.ly/W3Zaoq

source 

scienceyoucanlove:

X-ray of a ballet dancer’s feet 

The ankle joint connects the lower leg to the foot and, in dance, allows for pointing the toe (plantar flexion) and flexing the foot during plié (dorsiflexion). The ankle also allows for inversion and eversion, producing turn-in and turn-out, respectively. The 26 bones in the foot work in concert with ligamentous support and muscular force to create three separate arches, critical for shock absorption during jumps. Structurally, the ideal foot for ballet is considered to be a flexible “square foot”, which has equal-length first and second toes.

Read more: http://bit.ly/W3Zaoq

(via theolduvaigorge)